Jeremy Lin was Overlooked Because His Strengths are not Easily Measurable

There are lots of reasons why Lin has been overlooked for so long. Unconscious racial discrimination is part of it. But I actually don’t think that’s the main thing. Lin’s superstar strength is his decision-making and his courage when the game is on the line. This is not something that can be easily measured during scrimmage. I’ve read that he has a history of being terrible at practice. And this is actually quite understandable. Practice doesn’t count. There’s nothing on the line. And there’s really not much decision-making involved because the scenarios are all pre-planned. Also, when you’re the 5th guard on the team, as he so often was, you’re not going to be involved in many scrimmages. So I don’t think teams got to see what he can do and there was nothing to be impressed with. Also, before the game against Jersey, he only played during garbage time. Again, the stakes aren’t high. But also, with Lin, you need more than just a few minutes to really grasp how good he is, because everything that’s great about him takes time to see. Since his main strength is decision-making, you really need to see him in an entire game and in different scenarios to really appreciate what he can do. So I’m not at all surprised that he got cut and that it took utter desperation for Linsanity to happen. I don’t really blame the coaches and the scouts. That being said, he schooled John Wall during the NBA Summer league.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PvkXmMcGfLo]

I don’t know how you can watch this game and not see his potential. I think that’s where the discrimination comes in. Not just racial discrimination, but also the fact that he came from Harvard, etc. I think people just thought it was a one-off thing that he shows up during these big situations (again, he steps up his game when it matters). But it was actually because of his showing in this summer league game that got the Warriors interested in him and that’s why they picked him up. So they did notice. It’s just that when they brought him in during practice or garbage time, he didn’t do anything that really stood out, because these moments don’t play to his strengtsh. So that’s how he slipped through the cracks.

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  • MrPingPong
    • standupphilosopher

      Wow! I actually haven’t seen this article. This should have been passed around as much as Ed Weiland’s statistical analysis of Lin. Thanks for sharing. Great stuff.

      • MrPingPong
      • standupphilosopher

        There wasn’t an option to hit replay to your last post, So consider this as my reply to your last posts in which you included the two additional links. Thanks, again, for passing them along. They aren’t as impressive as the first link you posed. But I hadn’t seen them, either.

      • standupphilosopher

        Thanks for the correction (my bad). And thanks for the links.

        • MrPingPong

          I agree with your analysis, Philosopher. In sports, when everything is on the line, it becomes a mental game. I agree with you that one has to watch Lin play an entire game to see and appreciate how he and his teammates break down the oppositions’ mind. How can you beat a guy with fire in his heart and ice in his vein and whose teammates are mentally Linsane?